Reviews / Press

PRESS

REVIEWS

“The Producers”

National Tour Reviews – as Leo Bloom

“My favorite among the leads is Richard Lafleur, who gives us a distinctively
nebbish Leo. A strong singer, he also has great comic timing. I like that Lafleur has
a take on the role that feels distinctive (but still true), making me really root for
him.”
– www.fresnobee.com , The Fresno Bee

“David Johnson and Richard Lafleur as the titular producers play off each other
beautifully as well as provide separate comic entities. Lafleur, who may remind
you of Daniel Radcliff now that he’s outgrown Harry Potter, is just as neurotic as
Gene Wilder in the original movie but a little smoother. He’s also more believable
for me than the too-boyish Matthew Broderick of Broadway.”
– www.Kansas.com , The Witchita Eagle

“Richard Lafleur’s portrayal of the mousy accountant Leo Bloom stands in perfect
contrast to Johnson’s outgoing and delightfully over-the-top take on Bialystock.
Lafleur’s acting, singing, and dancing skills ensure that “I Wanna Be a Producer”
is a highlight. It was spot on perfection. Lafleur is also extremely likeable on
stage.”
– NYTheatreGuide.com

“Richard Lafleur provides an excellent example of the frantic, awkward energy that
playing Leo Bloom requires. Bialystock and Bloom brief, meaningful moments of
romance and true friendship, it is the story that intrigues new viewers and keeps
returning audiences coming back for more.”
– TheNewsHouse.com

“Richard Lafleur as simpering accountant Leo Bloom carried the show with style.
Lafleur in particular created hilarious details as with the way he clung to his Linuslike
blue blankie. Laughter can indeed be the best medicine, and the audience
roared with approval at the prescription of nonstop outlandish situations and comic
bits.”
– www.Cheiftain.com, The Pueblo Chieftain

“Playing Bialystock and Bloom are David Johnson and Richard Lafleur — and can
those two actors command the stage.
Their chemistry harkens back to the perfectly timed comedy that Laurel and Hardy
became legends with.
And Johnson and Lafluer had some pretty big shoes to fill as Nathan Lane and
Matthew Broderick were both in the successful run on Broadway and the feature –
length film. Both men made each character their own, which is no easy task
considering the success of the musical since 1968.”
– www.abqjournal.com , The Albuquerque Journal

“Sweet Charity”

Broward Stage Door Theatre – as Oscar Lindquist 

“Staged by Carbonell Award winner and Tony Nominated Michael Leeds, the show takes a while to get going, in part because one of its greatest assets – Richard Lafleur as Charity’s beau, Oscar Lindquist – Doesn’t appear until the end of the first act.”                                                                                                SouthFlorida.com/theatre-and-arts

“One of the best scenes is a claustrophobic sequence when Huegel and Lafleur are trapped in an elevator. Here she provides the strength to counter his claustrophobia. Later, when they are stuck high in the air on a Ferris wheel, their positions are reversed. He provides the courage to surmount her fear of heights. These two scenes provide a neat contrast as well as presenting the progression of their promising relationship.”                                                                                                                          -ChicagoCritic.com

Insurmountable Simplicities

Off Off Broadway at Dixon Place Theatre

“The ensemble of actors made up of Alex Herrald, Victoria Pollack, Richard Lafleur, and Alice Winslow does an excellent job in putting the fun back into philosophy.”
– nytheatre.com

“Using six stories enacted by four thoughtful and intelligent actors (Alex Herrald, Victoria Pollack, Richard LaFleur, Alice Winslow) their points are made humorously rather than pedantically and in a way that really struck a chord with me.”
– thehappiestmedium.com

The Winters Tale by William Shakespeare

The Tobacco Factory Theatre (Bristol, UK) – as Autolycus

“In a scene-stealing and very funny performance as the pickpocketing pedlar Autolycus, Richard Lafleur is given to belting out his lines in the form of 1960’s-style pop songs.”
– StageTalkMagazine.com

“Certainly comedy reigned in the scenes which involved Autolycus in the hands of Richard Lafleur a sharp-edged con man with the vocal style of an Elvis Presley.”
– The Bristol Post

“Yet the wicked rogue, Autolycus, played by Richard Lafleur, proved to be the ultimate show stealer with his dance routines, accomplished singing voice and gripping stage presence. His dapper routines made him the audience’s favourite and tipped the scales for me in awarding this show 4 stars instead of 3.”
– RemoteGoat.com